The Illustrated Eric (Discworld)

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Apr 19, Lindsay rated it really liked it. For me this is the second time I've read this, and the first time as a purely text book. Back in the day I had a copy of this edition: Eric with the Josh Kirby illustrations. Rincewind, last seen in dire peril as always in Sourcery , is summoned from Hell by a teenage demonologist. What follows is a typical Rincewind travelogue from ridiculous situation to ridiculous situation all with deeply witty and sarcastic commentary, both ar Part of the Pratchett reread with the SpecFic Buddy Reads group.

What follows is a typical Rincewind travelogue from ridiculous situation to ridiculous situation all with deeply witty and sarcastic commentary, both around what Rincewind and Eric are doing and the situation in Hell. The Rincewind books are possibly my least favorite books of the greater series. However, I think this is one of the stronger books for him largely because the formula kind of works better at the shorter format where the skit-comedy style scenarios can play out before they become repetitive and obnoxious.

I do have to comment that between Rincewind's long-established attitude towards women and the other main character being an over-indulged teenage boy, this book represents a nadir in terms of chauvinist jokes.

There are really only two things I can say about this novel, both of which count in its favour: 1. It's conveniently short and a quick read 2. It's very, very funny. View 2 comments. Jan 15, Audrey rated it liked it Shelves: audiobooks , humor-satire-goofy , fantasy , books. Eric, a pimply youth, summons a demon and demands three wishes.

But instead of a demon, he gets Rincewind. It was flight alone that counted. Book Blog Rincewind, eveyone's favorite wizard is back in Pratchett's take on Faust. Eric a very young demonologIist summons a demon. What he gets is Rincewind. The Luggage is not far behind. Shorter than most Discworld books, but every bit as funny. May 17, Jason rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction. If "Eric" were a food, it'd be a hot dog. It feels like Pratchett took random bits of humor that weren't good enough to make it in other books, and mushed them all together.

Eric is the lips and assholes of Pratchett's storytelling. Eric seems to exist soley to resolve the cliffhanger ending of Sourcery, and it does so with a moderately amusing Deus Ex Machina. The rest of the book is more like a Family Guy episode than a coherent novel. Jul 09, Ole Steinbru rated it liked it. Not the best discworld novel.

It was a bit all over the place. It had an interesting premise, but it could have been expanded a bit more on. Still great humour as always and the characters were interesting, felt a bit unfinished thought.

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Eric - Colin Smythe

Shelves: comedy. Rincewind goes to Hell 9 February Eric seems to be that Discworld book that was written after Guards Guards and before Moving Pictures that nobody ever mentions. In fact having a glance over the comments on Goodreads it seems that it is not all that liked, and when I asked my friend who loves anything that Terry Pratchett writes, he simply said that it was okay, it has its moments, but not one of his best. Mind you we both agreed that the part where they travel to Discworld's version of the Rincewind goes to Hell 9 February Eric seems to be that Discworld book that was written after Guards Guards and before Moving Pictures that nobody ever mentions.

Mind you we both agreed that the part where they travel to Discworld's version of the Trojan War was probably the highlight of the book, though I would have to also mention that the part where the guy whose hell is to endlessly push a boulder up a hill is replaced with somebody reading to him the entire Occupational Health and Safety Act along with commentaries was also a classic.

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The story begins with Rincewind, who if we remember, was trapped in the Dungeon Dimensions at the end of Sourcery, being summoned by fourteen year old Eric who has the dream of becoming the ruler of the world, marry the most beautiful woman in the world, and to live for ever. We then go on a journey to see these wishes fulfilled in a way that one would expect them to be fulfilled when the wishes are made to a demon though Rincewind continues to protest that he is not a demon, despite the luggage — I love the luggage — doing its best to prove this assertion false.

Once the wishes have all been fulfilled as it turns out the whole idea of Helen being the most beautiful woman in the world was something of a legend, though we must remember that over a period of ten years people do tend to age , and Eric has discovered that the fulfilment of these wishes are not what he particularly wanted sure, you can live forever, but you will begin your immortality at the beginning of the world, and continue on from there.

The final leg of their journey is into hell and we also get to see that road which is paved with good intentions. Now the idea of hell that Pratchett portrays is very interesting, and he sort of pokes holes in the current idea that we tend to have such as why is it when we don't have any nerves, or any body, are we inflicted with eternal pain? His idea of hell, and though he brushes over Satre's comment that hell is other people, is that it is pure, unadulterated boredom such as having the entire Occupational Health and Safety Act, inclusive of commentaries, being read to you.

Personally, I don't think any of us can truly imagine what Hell is really like, except for the fact that it is not a very nice place.

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Our current idea of Hell, being fire and brimstone, is something that was borrowed from the Greeks, and developed by both Milton and Dante. However, the idea that we exist in Hell in a spirit form is not biblical because the Bible suggests that in Hell we will have our flesh, and thus be able to experience pain. Mind you, one of the best ideas that I have encountered about Hell comes from C. Lewis ' The Great Divorce : Hell is not so much other people, but the fact that we cannot get along with other people, so we constantly seek loneliness.

Not only that but it is also psychological, in that we are forever cursing those who have sent us there, and are so horrified with who we are and what we have done, that while we can see heaven, we simply do not feel worthy enough go there. I read recently an article in the Australian Financial Review about the idea of hell, and one idea that came from that was that Heaven was Heaven simply because it is not Hell.

What was suggested was that those of us that are in Heaven could look down and see the fires and torments of Hell, and the fact that we were not there was what made heaven pleasurable. However that is a very smug and self-righteous view of what Heaven would be like, and to think that Heaven is being able to gloat over the fact that you are not suffering the way others are suffering is almost contradictory to the nature of God.

The Bible indicates that God is unwilling to see people go to Hell, but they go their under their own steam simply because they have rejected God's offer. As I have suggested elsewhere, it is like being given an invitation to a party, and turning that invitation down so that on the night of the party you are sitting at home alone wishing that you could go to that party, but not doing so because you said no, and then raving in anger at those people because they are having so much fun and I say that from experience. Rincewind may not be everyone's favourite character, but I like the shenanigans he gets involved with.

This is only my ninth Terry Pratchett book and I already feel like this is one of the most important series in my life. You know when you look back on a series wishing you could read it all over again for the first time? I feel oddly aware and privileged to be able to read 30 more of these for the first time. Normally this feeling doesn't hit me until after everything's over. I was expecting this book to be a lot worse than it actually turned out to be i. The social commentary was spot-on, and as for the humour, it was its usual fantastic self.

Nov 10, Melki rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy , humorous-fiction , time-travel. Be careful what you wish for Good fun, but not up to the usual Discworld standards. Aug 16, Juho Pohjalainen rated it liked it. I used to think this was one of the best in the series when I first got into Discworld books, when this was among the newest titles available - but I don't feel like it's held up all that well, and nowadays I find it one of the weaker ones.

The Illustrated Eric

The author is still seeking to break away from the somewhat shallow and thoughtless parody of the first novels, but the setting itself hasn't truly had the room to develop to any extent. So Eric falls about the middle, not belonging anywhere, and at the end o I used to think this was one of the best in the series when I first got into Discworld books, when this was among the newest titles available - but I don't feel like it's held up all that well, and nowadays I find it one of the weaker ones.

So Eric falls about the middle, not belonging anywhere, and at the end of the day is just a short and fairly meaningless adventure with a couple good laughs to it. Aug 22, Molly Billygoat rated it it was amazing.

Eric by Terry Pratchett

People who repair quantums I suppose. It stars a pimply, highly intelligent and pompous teenager who is determined to summon a demon so that he might demand riches, glory, and the most beautiful woman alive. What he manages to summon instead is the lovable but luckless Rincewind, well-known by all Pratchett enthusiasts. As usual, Rincewind takes the reader and, this time, Eric and a parrot on a hilarious, frenetic and fast-paced journey; for running away is his specialty.

They travel across Discworld, down into hell, backwards in time, and even outside of time.